Thursday, November 5, 2015

9 Year Old Boy Executed in Chicago--Where Are The Black MenMentors? Minneapolis Schools Work with Black Boys; I'm A Pretty LittleBlack Girl!; This Can't Happen in America, But It Did!!!


9 Year Old Boy Executed
Black Boys in Minneapolis
I'm A Pretty Little Black Girl!
This Can't Happen In America, But It Did!!!
Black Men United at Big Mama's Kitchen
Black Boys Who Cannot Read Well More Likely to Go To Prison
Black Girls Read for Cash and Glory
10 Rules for Police When Interacting with Black Youth
After 9 Year Old Boy Is Executed in Chicago Alley, (Probably by Young Black Men), Why Won't Black People Mentor Black Children???
(See Excuses Below)
I refuse to cry and I refuse to complain and I refuse to blame the police and I refuse to be angry. The day after TyShawn Lee was murdered, executed in a dirty alley, The Black Star Project was mentoring 30 young Black men away from violence, despair and death, towards peace, prosperity and life. We invited strong Black men to join us. Only three black women and one Black man came to our mentor training session. We will continue to have our children 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 years old shot down in our streets as long as we don't make any effort to change the trajectory of their lives and our communities. Not one of the 700 young Black men in our care over the years were involved in a shooting, stabbing or killing while in our care. And The Black Star Project will continue to work to save Black children with you or without you, until we are run out of business! -- Phillip Jackson 773.285.9600
Click Here to Read News Story
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12 Excuses Black People Make to Not Mentor Our Children:
  1. I'm too busy. I can't spare two hours a year!
  2. I can't take off of work! Ever!
  3. I am working with my own children.
  4. I am busy at church or mosque!
  5. I am a teacher all day with those children so I can't be with them after school!
  6. I need money! Mentoring does not pay me. I'm unemployed!
  7. I won't make a difference.
  8. Those children don't want to hear what I have to tell them.
  9. It's too dangerous!
  10. Somebody else can do it better than me.
  11. The job I have now is more important than mentoring Black children.
  12. I mentored a child, once, in 1967 or 1987.
We need an Army of
Mentors in Chicago!
There is still time for you to join us by calling 773.285.9600 or to meet us on Tuesday, November 10, 2015, 6:30 pm, at 3509 South King Drive, Suite 2B, Chicago, Illinois. If you can spare two hours a year to save Black children, call us.
Phillip Jackson
The Black Star Project
773.285.9600
Minneapolis' Anti-Bias Efforts Focus on Black Males
By Denisa R. Superville
October 27, 2015

In a small conference room at a South Minneapolis school, the principal and assistant principal were trying to come up with ways to get a group of eight black boys to be more engaged in school.

The administrators said they were concerned that the 8th graders, whom they described as extremely "smart" and potential "leaders," were disconnected from their classrooms and did not think it was "cool" to be smart. The administrators wanted to figure out how to get the boys to harness their strengths in a positive way.

They were brainstorming with Michael V. Walker, the director of the Minneapolis school district's Office of Black Male Student Achievement. As the lead figure in a district effort focused on its 8,963 black boys, Walker has the job ultimately, of helping close the achievement gap between them and their peers. In the 2014-15 school year African-Americans made up 37 percent of the 35,300-student district, Minnesota's largest.

In this city, as in many others, the data show the impetus for this effort. On almost every indicator related to school success, black boys are at, or near, the bottom. Nationwide, black boys are more likely than almost any other demographic slice of the school population to be suspended or expelled from school and to score at the lowest achievement level. They are also less likely to take honors classes or go to college.

Thus, Minneapolis is among a growing number of districts looking to right such imbalances by establishing specialized offices or dedicating staff members to work on equity, diversity, and inclusion.

The program is focused on improving educational and employment opportunities for boys of color.

Click Here to Read Full Article
I'M A PRETTY LITTLE BLACK GIRL!
"When I see myself in the mirror, I twirl,
And I yell, 'I'm a pretty little black girl!"
I'm A Pretty Little Black Girl! introduces adorable Mia, who wakes with her hair just-a-going every which-a-ways! With her abundant energy and joy leading the way, readers follow Mia as she plays with her friends who are all shades, shapes and sizes. There's tall Kia, Keisha the reader, Charlotte her best friend, Dina Rose-Marie the artist, Imani the dancer, Anna who loves sports, Ruby the singer, and honey-haired Tracy. Mia finds that Pretty is within herself and her friends, and being pretty is way beyond what the mirror shows. Perfect for young girls 4 to 8 years old.

Click Here to Purchase, "I'm Pretty Little Black Girl"
This Can't Happen
in Modern America!!
"The Hell It Can't. It Did!!!"
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Sorry You Missed One of the Most Powerful Presentations about the American Criminal Justice System Ever
Mr. Yusef Salaam, a member of The Central Park Five, spoke at The Black Star Project's Sunday University on his ordeal with the American criminal justice system, and how it and the New York Police Department framed him and his co-defendants.
In 1989, five (5) Black teen-age boys were accuse of raping and beating a young White Central Park woman jogger in New York City. They did not do it. They were arrested, convicted, imprisoned for years and exonerated.
After they were exonerated because they were innocent, these young 14-to 16-year old Black boys became heroes to much of New York City, a city that had previously called for their death. They stood their ground and stood on the principles of justice and fairness even though it meant spending up to 13 years of their lives in prison. Could you have done that?
Professor Yusef Salaam, seated center, with some of the more than 50 people who attended his lecture, saw a documentary and cheered him and the other Central Park Five on to victory and greatness!
Click Here to hear an interview with Professor Yusef Salaam on radio station WVON.
Please call Dorothy or George at 773.285.9600 if you are interested in bringing Professor Salaam to your city or university for a presentation.
Join
Black Men United
and
Big Mama's Kitchen
for the
November Hungry Club
Wednesday November 4, 2015
12 Noon to 1:00 pm
(during the lunch hour)
at
Big Mama's Kitchen
3223 N. 45th Street
Omaha, Nebraska
Phillip Jackson says, "I'll travel from Chicago to eat at Big Mama's Kitchen because Big Mama (right) shows that Big Mama love to all of her customers!"
The "Hungry Club" meets the first Wednesday of every month at Big Mama's Kitchen & Catering from 12:00 noon - 1:00 pm. This is an opportunity for members of the community to come together and enjoy a great meal, or a beverage, listen to information presented by guest speakers on topics concerning the Greater Omaha Community and north Omaha and to network.
With Open Enrollment beginning November 1st at www.healthcare.gov
our November guest Speaker is:
Paul Wojtkiewicz
owner of J Keller Insurance
an expert on making the Affordable Healthcare Act work for you and your family!
Bring your questions and concerns!

Please call (402)965-1003 for more information.
Free Reading Instruction for
1st- to 4th-Grade Black Boys
It is said that if a Black boy is not reading at grade level by third grade, the United States is building a prison cell for him. One out of three Black boys born after 2001 is projected to spend time in prison. Most of those will have poor reading skills. If you are depending on the schools of America to properly educate Black boys to read and to succeed, then you are the problem! The Black community and Black parents are responsible for educating Black boys and teaching them to read well--not schools, not bureaucrats.
Join us on Saturday for our
Saturday University
Black Male Reading Academy
9:00 am to 11:00 am
3509 South King Drive
Chicago, Illinois
Please call Dorothy or George at 773.285.9600 to register your son for this opportunity.
On Saturday, November 7, 2015, 1:30 pm to 4:30 pm, at 3509 South King Drive, Chicago, Illinois, The Black Star Project is sponsoring
Black Girls Read
for Cash and Glory!
Top Prizes for 9th- to 12th-grade Black female readers
$200.00 for 1st Place
$175.00 for 2nd Place
$125.00 for 3rd Place
Top Prizes for 5th- to 8th-grade Black female readers
$150.00 for 1st Place
$125.00 for 2nd Place
$100.00 for 3rd Place
Top Prizes for 1st- to 4th-grade Black female readers
$100 for 1st Place
$75.00 for 2nd Place
$50.00 for 3rd Place
Young women will read passages from Ida B. Wells, Fannie Lou Hamer, Harriet Tubman, Maya Angelou, Coretta Scott King, Sojourner Truth, Rosa Parks, Betty Shabazz, Rose Marie Harding or other great Black heroines from history.

You must register to participate in this event. Registration is limited. This competition is only open to young Black females.You must bring proof of grade level to enter this contest. Awards will not be given without proof of grade level.
Readers will be judged by a panel of educators, mentors and community members.

Selected winners will read to all of Chicago on The Parent Revolution Radio Show onWVON1690AM.

All prizes will be awarded within one week of November 7, 2015.
Please call 773.285.9600 to register your Black girls and young Black women readers for this competition of courage, skill and excellence. This event is open to the public.
Dear Friend of
The Black Star Project,
We have the power to help educate Black students, and all students, in America. We have the power to put strong, positive, caring Black men in the lives of Black boys. We have the power to change the course of African people in America and throughout the world. But we must take that power!
The Black Star Project is working night and day to advocate for our children's well-being and provide necessary programs and services to support struggling Black students in our global educational ecology.

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